@FatTrel:

FAT TREL - “SWISHERS & LIQUOR” Video

Fat Trel - Nightmare On E Street Review

District of Columbia rapper Fat Trel’s latest mixtape “Nightmare on E Street” dropped Tuesday morning.  Highly anticipated, Trel’s fourth tape is a move towards the mainstream, and after years of local support he seems to finally be making waves nationwide.  Three days after the release, it has gained over 100,000 combined views on the two websites it can be streamed on, indicating Trel may finally be moving towards the mainstream.  His musical output reflects this, with a variety of songs and styles attempting to please a diverse audience.  This variety makes sense; Fat Trel is a rapper for the youth.

DC’s “Fat Fool” may have tried too hard to appeal to everyone.  The mixtape was a little disappointing.  With over 20 tracks, clocking in at around an hour and a half of music, Trel has auto-tuned R & B jams for the ladies, trap hits, go-go raps, introspective songs and generic pop rapping.   He shows his ability to appeal to hip-hop purists and trap fans with tracks like the Rick Ross sampling “Deep in the Game”, which has ominous piano notes that sink into the brain and “Swishers and Liquor” which sounds like old school southern rap. 

Songs like “Find My Way” featuring local R&B crooner Raheem Devaughn are expected from a Fat Trel mixtape- the track is catchy and with go-go influenced drums.  On the other hand, songs like “Freak It”, “On Top of Your Girl”, “Fuck” “By the Way” and “Nightmare” sound like club and radio rap, electronic synth sounds, singing hooks and average raps about Trel’s life of sex, partying and drug use.  They also feature other up and coming rappers like David Correy and Kirko Bangz.  Although Trel has always been known for his poppy tunes, these seem like cop outs toward a mainstream audience.

My favorite track is the outro, which tells stories of street regrets and reminiscing, harkening back to older Fat Trel content.  Even if the mixtape didn’t seem to fit together, with its many different styles and its clear attempt to appeal to the mainstream, it was still satisfying to see Trel succeed.   Even with his tales of ecstasy-filled nights and days trapping in the streets, he is relatable to most of the youth in the DC area.  He is approachable, taking pictures with fans anywhere and is often seen at local high schools and shopping malls; we even have mutual friends on Facebook.  At concerts you could easily see a diverse audience, with teenagers and 20-somethings of various backgrounds all supporting Trel.

Even if this tape seems a little bit like an appeal towards national audiences, at least it is Trel and his team choosing to do so (hopefully) and not a major label; he currently remains signed to a label he helped found a few months ago, DC1135.  If this mixtape puts Trel on some big record label roster, no one deserves it more, he has worked hard to gain the respect in the local music scene and even if he does “sell out” (a term I dislike) at least we know he’ll keeping making records for everyone.

Note: This review will be published in the latest issue of the newspaper “Botetourt Squat” (a student newspaper at William and & Mary.)  Thanks to them.

Fat Trel - Nightmare On E Street →

necktomace:

I interviewed Fat Trel and took some pictures. We talked about U street, the not-real face of DC, South Beach, Rick Ross, Little Walter and white people. They also handed me the lead single from Nightmare on E st.
Check it out if you’ve got time.

necktomace:

I interviewed Fat Trel and took some pictures. We talked about U street, the not-real face of DC, South Beach, Rick Ross, Little Walter and white people. They also handed me the lead single from Nightmare on E st.


Check it out if you’ve got time.

(Source: holditsauce)

necktomace:

Boosa da Shoota — Got It All f/ Yung Gleesh & Meatchi (YouTube, 2012)

Yung Gleesh is a shitbag; in his trunk he got a monkey suit

Fat Trel 93.9 WKYS interview

necktomace:

Chris Bo — Goonz (DC1135, 2012)

Nina = for eating. 40 = for sleeping. Chopper = for beefing. Fifth = for smoking. 30 clip = for driving. A gun for every occasion.

A large part of Fat Trel’s success so far, beltway and beyond, is that he’s surrounded himself with a really dynamic group of artists: the Slutty Boyz ratchet-ass kids, Young Moe rapidly progressing with every release, and Chris Bo, who up till now was mostly just a featured player (here, here, and there) but now is starting to get the push from Trel’s DC1135 imprint to release his own work, Your Heart of Minez, later this month. It’s not a revolutionary idea, surrounding yourself with talent, but since there are so many rappers that are happy enough with yes-men cliques and collaborators, it’s nice to know that there are rappers that still take the time to build a worthwhile roster, something “real hip-hop heads” are painfully blind to when it comes to groups like Bricksquad.